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Eyes in the world

Eyes in the world

72" x 96" oil on canvas

Further to my point about shared biological history of aggression. Freud locates this history in the human unconscious or what he called primary processes. Most thinkers situate primary processes as an earlier form of thinking in our development as individual subjects. Meaning that primary processes pertain to all of nature, not just the human psyche. Nature evolves and contains human life, and human life, in the mirroring of the creative and destructive forces of nature, can grasp something of the dynamics of the psyche of nature.

Current neuroscientific understanding of the evolution of the human consciousness insists that biological hardware is the genesis of consciousness and not an ‘ephemeral’ entelechy-type entity. And that while we humans experience selfhood as an internal, chimeric domain introspection is actually a fully explicable result of the differences in the supplementary functioning between the superior surfaces of the two hemispheres that register pre-action potentials

Forest and Night

Forest and Night

oil on canvas 56” x 56”

2018

Overgrown

Overgrown

66" x 80" oil on canvas

Whatever “the other” represents -stories, myths, events is situated between humans and material reality. In this way humans are positioned as separate from nature and landscape. I’m interested in how that occurs. I’m interested in questioning that dynamic.

At the Grey Tree

At the Grey Tree

68" x 76" oil on linen

Much of our darkest collective stuff seems to happen in forests. I find this immensely fascinating.  No less so because I grew up in Australia where colonial history intersects with the long indigenous history in ways that all Australian people are obviously still grappling with. How the landscape figures in that story affects me deeply.

Swamp

Swamp

Unstretched Scroll oil on canvas 66" x 94"

Can a landscape painting that contains nothing of human making or design speak to our history, our present our future? Of course a painting is never devoid of human design since our eyes create the frame in which we view or comprehend something beyond our immediate body.

A picture, whether photograph or painting always already separates us and defines us away from the thing we see. We capture and release it back into the wild. Therein lies a vestige of the human’s ‘design within nature’.

Laurel and Skull

Laurel and Skull

60" x 72" oil on linen

I wanted to get at this idea of a forest as a place for psychic projection of the social imaginary.

I reference a fragment of a Roman wreath from a bust sculpture juxtaposed with fragments of several indigenous masks suggesting the ways the artifacts of a culture speak to the history and issues of domination by colonial culture.

Bialoweizca Forest

Bialoweizca Forest

60" x 72" oil on canvas

Crypsis

Crypsis

72" x 96" oil on canvas

Even though Post Impressionism, Symbolism and Expressionism seem like outmoded terms in this post human, pervasively digitized realm, manyfigurative painters (myself included) still labor under the same formal conceptual rigors of the late 19th early 20th centuries while attempting to depict contemporary states of being and the socio-contextual identity of the artist.

The 'masks' I reference here are an Islamic warrior mask, Roman warrior bust and a Mesopotamian clay mask of Huwawa guardian of the Sumerian cedar forest. In order for the masks to blend with the forest I rendered the landscape more loosely. In the breaking up of the planes the spaces in the painting seemed to flatten and resemble camouflage pattern. I wondered what this ‘accidental’ camouflage might signify in relation to my ideas surrounding collective social imaginary?

Voices in the Forest

Voices in the Forest

72" x 96" oil on canvas

…I’m thinking about disembodied voices in the present, past and future loops. Evoking perhaps in the most literal sense a voice that calls out in the dark forest, or the voice that comes from inside a technological device or the voice that issues from history. Not forgetting of course our own internal voice. Who is speaking?

Of all my  recent forest paintings I find this piece to be the most personally exciting since it poses questions that I don’t yet have answers for, presents challenges in terms of content and formal construct that I haven’t quite figured out. It represents just one possible point of departure for subsequent works.

Mustard Grass

Mustard Grass

60" x 72" oil on linen

Eyes in the world

72" x 96" oil on canvas

Further to my point about shared biological history of aggression. Freud locates this history in the human unconscious or what he called primary processes. Most thinkers situate primary processes as an earlier form of thinking in our development as individual subjects. Meaning that primary processes pertain to all of nature, not just the human psyche. Nature evolves and contains human life, and human life, in the mirroring of the creative and destructive forces of nature, can grasp something of the dynamics of the psyche of nature.

Current neuroscientific understanding of the evolution of the human consciousness insists that biological hardware is the genesis of consciousness and not an ‘ephemeral’ entelechy-type entity. And that while we humans experience selfhood as an internal, chimeric domain introspection is actually a fully explicable result of the differences in the supplementary functioning between the superior surfaces of the two hemispheres that register pre-action potentials

Forest and Night

oil on canvas 56” x 56”

2018

Overgrown

66" x 80" oil on canvas

Whatever “the other” represents -stories, myths, events is situated between humans and material reality. In this way humans are positioned as separate from nature and landscape. I’m interested in how that occurs. I’m interested in questioning that dynamic.

At the Grey Tree

68" x 76" oil on linen

Much of our darkest collective stuff seems to happen in forests. I find this immensely fascinating.  No less so because I grew up in Australia where colonial history intersects with the long indigenous history in ways that all Australian people are obviously still grappling with. How the landscape figures in that story affects me deeply.

Swamp

Unstretched Scroll oil on canvas 66" x 94"

Can a landscape painting that contains nothing of human making or design speak to our history, our present our future? Of course a painting is never devoid of human design since our eyes create the frame in which we view or comprehend something beyond our immediate body.

A picture, whether photograph or painting always already separates us and defines us away from the thing we see. We capture and release it back into the wild. Therein lies a vestige of the human’s ‘design within nature’.

Laurel and Skull

60" x 72" oil on linen

I wanted to get at this idea of a forest as a place for psychic projection of the social imaginary.

I reference a fragment of a Roman wreath from a bust sculpture juxtaposed with fragments of several indigenous masks suggesting the ways the artifacts of a culture speak to the history and issues of domination by colonial culture.

Bialoweizca Forest

60" x 72" oil on canvas

Crypsis

72" x 96" oil on canvas

Even though Post Impressionism, Symbolism and Expressionism seem like outmoded terms in this post human, pervasively digitized realm, manyfigurative painters (myself included) still labor under the same formal conceptual rigors of the late 19th early 20th centuries while attempting to depict contemporary states of being and the socio-contextual identity of the artist.

The 'masks' I reference here are an Islamic warrior mask, Roman warrior bust and a Mesopotamian clay mask of Huwawa guardian of the Sumerian cedar forest. In order for the masks to blend with the forest I rendered the landscape more loosely. In the breaking up of the planes the spaces in the painting seemed to flatten and resemble camouflage pattern. I wondered what this ‘accidental’ camouflage might signify in relation to my ideas surrounding collective social imaginary?

Voices in the Forest

72" x 96" oil on canvas

…I’m thinking about disembodied voices in the present, past and future loops. Evoking perhaps in the most literal sense a voice that calls out in the dark forest, or the voice that comes from inside a technological device or the voice that issues from history. Not forgetting of course our own internal voice. Who is speaking?

Of all my  recent forest paintings I find this piece to be the most personally exciting since it poses questions that I don’t yet have answers for, presents challenges in terms of content and formal construct that I haven’t quite figured out. It represents just one possible point of departure for subsequent works.

Mustard Grass

60" x 72" oil on linen

Eyes in the world
Forest and Night
Overgrown
At the Grey Tree
Swamp
Laurel and Skull
Bialoweizca Forest
Crypsis
Voices in the Forest
Mustard Grass